Perfil

Fecha de registro: 18 may 2022

Sobre...

you are using WKWebView and WKWebView only works on iOS8 and above. You need to replace WKWebView with UIWebView. This should solve your



 

Tomtom Aktualizace Map Warez Forum


Download


 





A: If you see this in your console before it crashes: The WKWebView is asking for the user's permission to access their location. This is because you are using WKWebView and WKWebView only works on iOS8 and above. You need to replace WKWebView with UIWebView. This should solve your issue. Your specific issue seems to be that you have a JS error causing the crash: Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property'read' of null This is probably caused by your JS calling an endpoint that doesn't exist. For example, I had a JS endpoint that sent a location to my backend, which crashed my app when I ran it. Then I added logging to the backend and found that the endpoint wasn't being hit when I triggered my JS. This led me to an additional error that my backend was not properly configured. In your JS, make sure that the data you're calling is valid. Also, make sure that your API is properly configured to respond to the request. Once you've ruled out those errors, then you might want to see if there's a more fundamental issue in your code. -1}$, where $N$ is the number of atoms and $f_{ m T}$ the trap frequency. The atomic cloud’s position was determined by atom counting which was performed at a repetition rate of $f_{ m R}=80$ Hz. The cloud’s density was determined from the integrated atomic absorption spectrum as a function of time of the laser after the atoms are released. A gas sample was loaded into the sample cell and its density was varied by varying the pressure of the buffer gas. The maximum density was achieved for a buffer gas pressure of about 20 mbar and a laser power of 100 W. For a 20 mbar buffer gas pressure and a laser power of about 200 W, the cloud is composed of 100 000 atoms, corresponding to a peak density of $7 imes 10^{11}$ atoms/${ m cm}^3$. Using an atom counting rate of 600 s$^{ -1}$, we estimate that this corresponds to a trap lifetime of $1.2$ s. For a laser power of 100 W, the atoms are still in the trap when they are released, and they fly away due to residual gravity. Using a 100 W laser power,




ee43de4aa9

T

Tomtom Aktualizace Map Warez Forum

Más opciones